The blog.


Amelia Jones


Eats Shoots and Leaves

Eats Shoots and Leaves

Ink, watercolor, rice paper, mulberry paper
15” x 15”

Maize and Bees

Maize and Bees

Ink, watercolor, rice paper, mulberry paper
15” x 15”

Golden Flower of Unani

Golden Flower of Unani

Ink, watercolor, tea, rice paper, mulberry paper
15” x 21”


 
AmeliaHeadshot“I can’t remember a time before I began to express my creativity through the arts. I attended public school before the arts programs were decimated by budget cuts. In hindsight it seems as if the arts were all around us. We all participated in visual art, music–both choral and instrumental, creative writing and drama. My parents arranged for additional lessons in music and dance. We regularly sang in church. In my pursuit of higher education I was fortunate to attend a liberal arts college where I was able to explore other areas of artistic expression such as textile design, calligraphy and sculpture. As a young adult I found the martial arts which led to my 30+ year practice. Through the martial arts I discovered a passion for my current path of Chinese healing arts, and study of the Asian brush.

On a visit to the Anasazi Museum in Chaco Canyon, NM, I found the words of the Diné Blessingway ceremony, excerpted here, which continue to resonate,

“Today I will walk out, today everything evil will leave me, I will be as I was before, I will have a cool breeze over my body. I will have a light body, I will be happy forever, nothing will hinder me. I walk with beauty before me. I walk with beauty behind me. I walk with beauty below me. I walk with beauty above me. I walk with beauty around me. My words will be beautiful.  In beauty all day long may I walk. Through the returning seasons, may I walk. On the trail marked with pollen may I walk. With dew about my feet, may I walk. In old age wandering on a trail of beauty, lively, may I walk. In old age wandering on a trail of beauty, living again, may I walk. My words will be beautiful.”

 

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B.F. Shepperd


Baby Big Horns

Baby Big Horns

Oil on panel
12 x 7.5

The Arlington Cemetery Caisson Horses

The Arlington Cemetery Caisson Horses

Oil on panel
24 x 18

Donkey & Goat at Twilight

Donkey & Goat at Twilight

Oil on panel
17 x 11

Incense Burning

Incense Burning

Oil on panel
12 x 7.5

Polar Bears ~ Endangered

Polar Bears ~ Endangered

Oil on panel
13 x 8

Lion Call

Lion Call

Oil on panel
13 x 8

Lioness At Rest

Lioness At Rest

Oil on panel
Large Size : 18 x 28
Small Size : 13 x 8


 
Copy of 20160621_1621451Forrest Sheperd has studied as a fine artist since his teens. From High School, he attended evening and weekend classes with Cesare Borgia, the principal instructor at the Reilly League of Artists in White Plains, NY. Forrest’s figurative, American impressionist painting style is directly related to this early training Mr. Borgia founded the Reilly League, following the painting techniques of the late Frank Reilly, who was one of the most influential art teachers of his time at the Art Students League in New York. Forrest was a Reilly League member and student artist from 1980 until 1987, studying the traditional techniques of portraiture, figure painting and life drawing. These Reilly League techniques are also evident in Forrest’s composition and understanding of the science of light – an approach first promoted by the great impressionists. Forrest says that he was influenced by the full spectrum of talent among master painters, going back to Jan Van Eyck, who is considered the grandfather of oil painting.

“They were true craftsmen as well as artists,” Forrest says, adding that “The age old craft of art’ is of greater value, than adhering to any painting style, or historic period of art.”

For the past 32 years, Forrest pursued multiple degrees, earning a Bachelor’s degree in Wildlife Management at Syracuse University (SUNY College, ESF), and a Master’s Degree in Wildlife Sciences at Purdue University. Forrest was fascinated with anatomy and mammals of all species. He graduated with honors and pursued a career as an executive in Geographic Information Systems in California and the Washington, D.C. area, before returning to New York in 2009.
Today, Forrest and Hillary Sheperd own and operate the Servpro of Scarsdale/Mount Vernon in Westchester, NY, and he paints when he can. Forrest prefers working with oils on hardboard panels.

Forrest prepares each panel with a custom rabbit skin glue sizing – that is then gessoed with a traditional recipe of rabbit skin glue, gypsum and whiting. Because panels are impractical for larger paintings, Forrest switches to fine linen canvas.
“My job is to create paintings that tell a story, using the tools of composition, color and tone – and, light of course. This gives expression to visual melodies and harmonies that I find in the natural world. If I’m successful, you can share in the emotions inherent in art.”
 

Paula Barragan for “Rescue Me”


Mosca Mashpi

Mosca Mashpi

Adobe Illustrator Collage, Archival Print
44" x 38"

Desde el Canopi

Desde el Canopi

Adobe Illustrator Collage, Archival Print
43" x 51"

Jungla de Papel II

Jungla de Papel II

Adobe Illustrator Collage, Archival Print
43" x 51" (Artist Proof)
44" x 51" (Normal Size)

Geografía Marina

Geografía Marina

Adobe Illustrator Collage, Archival Print
Edition: 2/60
28" x 22"


 
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“My first studies were in design and illustration and this has influenced all my further work. Together with my artistic vision I have developed a creative process expressed in all my projects, my etchings, drawings, and paintings. I proceed in distinct ways according to the work I wish to present. When I begin a graphic design project I must communicate a certain message. On the contrary, when I start an etching, a drawing or painting I prefer to let my intuition work.

I find it difficult to explain the way I work some of my art projects but perhaps the strongest reason is the profound pleasure I experience during the process of discovering things. Even though sometimes this brings tension and stress.

I love creating with my hands and I put the same energy into all types of art with out making distinction between crafts and design, drawing, or printing. Above all I find deep satisfaction in good, new discoveries and working hard at all aspects of my work.

I work on very different themes. These give me space to tell various situations and stories of life. I have the possibility to express emotions; shyness, delight, misfortune; through forms and lines, color and light. I draw my ideas and the lives of people, animals and actions taking place in different spaces inside paintings, prints or drawings. I enjoy profoundly the process of doing my work.”
 

Alexa Grace for “Rescue Me”


Bird On Tiptoes

Bird On Tiptoes

Ink Brush on Paper
12" x 9"

Elephant

Elephant

Etching
12" x 9"

Upon Meeting A Fox

Upon Meeting A Fox

Silkscreen Paint on Paper
16" x 16"

You're Not Totally Alone

You're Not Totally Alone

Ink, Drawing, Thread, Paper
5.5" x 9"

Boy With Wild Cat

Boy With Wild Cat

Silkscreen on Paper
13" x 18"

Sandy with a Glass Eye

Sandy with a Glass Eye

Sand Painting on Textured Paper


 
Screen-Shot-2015-08-11-at-3.44.00-PM“Alexa Grace received her BFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York City. She began illustrating for The Atlantic Monthly, Harpers, The Village Voice, The New York Times, Vanity Fair, both Time and LIFE Magazines, Newsweek, The Washington Post, The Detroit Free Press, L.A. Times, Mademoiselle, Dia Nappon Printing, etc.

She has four published books – Un Journey de Chien, Hachette, Paris, When Moma Retires, Knopf, The Baby Book, Running Press, Uncommon Wisdom, and Ariel Books. She is currently working on another children’s book for Gallimard, Paris.

Alexa artistically focuses on collage, assemblage, drawing, jewelry and ornament. Her porcelain work was first exhibited at The Graham Gallery along side Edward Gorey in 1976. She had a one-women exhibition of American Women Illustrators. She was included in The John Michael Kolar Center of Surrealist Art Exhibition.

She has lectured at Rhode Island School of Design, the University of Kansas, and has given an illustration workshop at The Walker Arts Center. She was awarded a grant from Art Park, Buffalo, NY.”  

Alexander Rutsch for “Rescue Me”


Monkeys

Monkeys

Mixed Media
Solid Frame
28 x 34- Unframed

Monkey with Orange

Monkey with Orange

Mixed Media
Gold Frame
30 x 40- Unframed

Jungle

Jungle

Acrylic On Canvas
Black Frame
30 x 40- Unframed

Dog

Dog

Pastel
Antique Frame
20 x 24- Unframed

 Cats Green

Cats Green

Mixed Media
Metal Frame
22 x 28- Unframed

Purple Dog

Purple Dog

Mixed Media
Metal Frame
22 x 28- Unframed

Cats Orange

Cats Orange

Mixed Media
Metal Frame
18 x 24 - Unframed


 
AlexanderRutsh-LGheadshot-820x1093“My dreams are color and life. They soar in my head like millions of symphonies. I can never stop building dreams.” Alexander Rutsch was born in Russia in 1916 but raised in Belgrade, Yugoslavia. After studying voice in Austria he became and opera singer like his parents, but after WWI, Rutsch’s love for visual expression propelled him to change careers. He was a painter, sculptor, philosopher, musician, singer and poet.

He was an artist of the purest breed-an artist who had no choice but to paint. He was a chosen traveler of the depths of existence; a man who followed a longing to explore his inner self and relate his findings with the energy of the universe.

The celebrated Austrian artist approached painting and sculpting as he lived life- with the eyes of a child and the hand of a poet. Constantly in the quest for rhythms of form and vibrations of color, he caught the “sparks in the shadow” and evidenced their fullest reality and beauty in his creations. While he may have attributed certain artistic expressions to “coincidence”, his inspiration came from such diverse sources as: memories, dreams, sounds, numbers, telephone poles, and driftwood. Rutsch had an affinity to vibrant colors, strong contours and rich brush strokes, which are apparent in his oils, mixed media works and ink drawings.

His work is held in the collections of H.M Queen Fabiola of Belgium, Walter Cronkite of New York, Gala and Salvador Dali, Sammy Davis Jr, Jacqueline Kennedy- Onassis, Guy Laroche of Paris, Belgium’s Museum of Liège, Paris’s Musée d’Art Moderne, New York’s Museum of Modern Art and Baroness Alix de Rothschild of France.

Alexander Rutsch passed away in 1997. His friends, supporters and family established the bi-annual Alexander Rutsch Award and Exhibition competition for visual artist.  This program continues his belief that art transcends all of our humanity.
 

 

Pasquale Miele for “Rescue Me”


The Cat II

The Cat II

Crayon & Paint on Wooden Sculpture
6” H x 15” W

The Cat

The Cat

Crayon & Paint on Wooden Sculpture
9.8” H x 9” W

The Bunny

The Bunny

Crayon & Paint on Wooden Sculpture
16” H x 12.5” W

The Dude

The Dude

Crayon & Paint on Wooden Sculpture
16” H x 12.5” W

The Donkey Man

The Donkey Man

Crayon & Paint on Wooden Sculpture
21” H x 9.5” W

Creatures of the Night I

Creatures of the Night I

Oil & Paint on Canvas
30” H x 24” W

Creatures of the Night II

Creatures of the Night II

Oil & Paint on Canvas
24” H x 18” W

Creatures of the Night III

Creatures of the Night III

Oil & Paint on Canvas
24” H x 18” W

Evolution I

Evolution I

Oil & Paint on Canvas
40” H x 30” W

Evolution II

Evolution II

Oil & Paint on Canvas
36” H x 30” W


 
headshot-resized“I was born in Italy. My education was up to 8th grade. I came to the USA when I was seventeen. My first job was pressing baby clothes. After I did gardening and landscaping, I worked in the garden of Pauline Trigère. She had many exotic plants that she wanted to look as beautiful as possible. I had to clip them all by hand. That’s when I began to see the wonders and beauty of nature.

In the late eighties, I had a massive heart attack. The doctor told me I had to stop landscaping. The first few months I did not know what to do. I started to paint but did not like it. Then I started to carve and do clay statues and I loved it.

When I walk in the woods, certain shapes of roots get my attention and I have to stop to pick them up. As soon as I put my hands on them, I see what they will look like and what they will become. My job is just to carve certain spots to highlight what I see.

I have been creating these woodcarvings for over twenty years. Some of them have been on display at the New Rochelle library and other local businesses. I have won many prizes for my artwork including first, second, and third prize.”