Cecile Brunswick


Tangiers Boat Abstract

Tangiers Boat Abstract

Oil
45 x 50 in.

Fishing Village, Morocco

Fishing Village, Morocco

Oil
50 x 45 in.

Shady Building, Morocco

Shady Building, Morocco

Oil
45 x 50 in.

Japanese Lanterns

Japanese Lanterns

Oil
22 x 28 in.

Swirl

Swirl

Oil
20 x 24 in.

Chefchouen Falls, Morocco

Chefchouen Falls, Morocco

Oil
28 x 30 in.

-Honey Dew-_25.5x17.5-_1994 copy_sf slides001

-Honey Dew-_25.5x17.5-_1994 copy_sf slides001

 
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“Abstract imagery is how I physically and emotionally interpret the world I inhabit, whether it be New York City construction sites, weather-beaten poster remnants glued to billboards, or scenes experienced in exotic countries like Morocco, Mexico, Spain or Turkey.

The light, colors, architecture, music and warmth of the people I meet, leave indelible impressions which ultimately permeate my paintings.

Color and the shapes used in my paintings are primary considerations. The need to create a unified balance allowing the viewer’s eyes to flow around the canvas while stopping to rest at strategic areas is crucial to the success of the painting.

I use high quality oil paints made by Old Holland on roughly textured Belgian linen canvas. I often photograph scenes while on trips at home, abroad or local architecture and construction sites; these provide materials which, abstracted, infiltrate new works. A background as a trained singer contributes to the flow and energy evidenced in the finished painting.”

Cecile moved to New York City as a child from Antwerp, Belgium where she was born. This change made her very interested in and sensitive to people from foreign cultures. Raised in a musical family, she went on to Queens College (BA) and earned a Master’s Degree at Columbia University School of International & Public Affairs. She then took courses in film, video and photography, obtained an Associates Degree from New York University’s Adult Education Program and became a free-lance photographer. Furthermore, she went on to study at Parsons and the Arts Students League where she exchanged her camera and lenses for paints, brushes and canvas.

 

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