Mary Ann Lomonaco


Mop with Clothes Pins

Mop with Clothes Pins

Dyed Kitchen Mop, Glass Beads, Mini Clothes Pins, Wooden Dowels
24" x 14" x 9"

Hanging Out

Hanging Out

Clothes Pins Triptych
38" x 40" x 3"

Mop with Feathers

Mop with Feathers

Dyed Kitchen Mop, Bone Beads, Feathers
24" x 10" x 9"

50 Stars

50 Stars

Embroidered Roof, Flashing, Bottle Caps
26" x 44" x 3"

Mop with Delicas

Mop with Delicas

Dyed Kitchen Mop, Japanese Glass beads
25" x 12" x 6"

Coke & Buttons

Coke & Buttons

12" x 9" x 4"

 

mary ann lomonico transform gallery

As a fiber artist/papermaker, I’ve worked with many materials. One day, I was preparing to cut up a kitchen mop head to use as a cellulose fiber and put into my paper beater for pulp. I placed it on a hook as I went to get my scissors, and was struck by how much it resembled the beautiful masks/headdresses from Papua New Guinea I’ve admired at the Metropolitan Museum’s Rockefeller Collection.

I’d always been attracted to primitive art with its ability to transform humble items of everyday life into tactile, innovative works of art. I began to explore the possibilities of using the kitchen mops as the common element and incorporating everyday objects into my contemporary headdresses.

My everyday objects are found in hardware stores and recycling bins and consist of items such as soda can tabs, nails, washers, grommets, roof flashing. It’s very exciting for me to transform the menial mops into objects of beauty using these diverse materials we see everyday and using them in a unique way.

Each mop has its own particular growth patterns and as I employ different techniques to change each one, each evolves and manifests itself differently. I love altering mundane objects so they can be seen anew; to take ordinary items that otherwise might be discarded as valueless; to create an “Aha!” moment that enables people to really look and see. I plan to expand upon these techniques, ideas and use of materials to move forward in my exploration of the limitless possibilities of the kitchen mops.

As a result of my work with the mops, over the past year I’ve been experimenting with other everyday items, such as olive oil cans, old ties, soda cans and roof flashing. I’ve been deconstructing ordinary objects and reassembling them which results in looking at their potential a new. It’s a further exploration of our notions of what’s valuable and what makes art.

 

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