Tag: abstract


PHOTO BLOG : Larger than LIFE


transFORM Gallery, and our event sponsor, Westchester Magazine, thank all of you who attended our Opening Reception of “Larger than LIFE” on Saturday, March 5th.

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With over 75 guests, we were delighted to see many new and familiar faces in attendance. Aside from the artwork, guests enjoyed great food provided by Eastchester Fish Gourmet and musical entertainment by Jazz Vibraphonist, Eric Katz.

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The outstanding work of Sonne Hernandez, aka SJ Riley and Michael Thornton-Smith was further enhanced by their commentary on their artwork and creative process. Andreas Messis (Co-Founder) and Kara O’Neill (Art Gallery Director), opened the presentation by explaining transFORM Gallery’s innovative concept. Kara’s thought-provoking talk was centered around our artists’ ability to paint life as we know it – this time depicted exceedingly bigger, more impressive, evocative and memorable.

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Sonne Hernandez approaches her composition with her deteriorating eyes, being severely near-sighted she mimics how she sees her world around her. Her abstract photo-realism oil paintings, evoke the viewer to both come closer and stand back to visually process the paintings. Sonne explains it best, “having to come very close to the recognize the objects while everything around it disappears produces a feeling of larger than life.”  

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Michael Thornton-Smith spoke about his exploration into the dynamic forms and saturated colors of selected flowers. “As I became more comfortable working with a subject matter I had shied away from previously – I began to play with enormity, scale and abstraction of the subject attempting to achieve a luminosity inherent in particular varieties of flowers.”

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The Dandelion flower became his jumping off point into create cosmic mandalas of light. At first they were monochromatic paintings concentrating on the essence of form but eventually led to working with ethereal and tertiary colors.

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A big transFORM thank you goes out to our two artist – Sonne and Michael.

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We’d also like to say a huge thank to those who joined us in launching “Larger than LIFE”.

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If you missed the Opening Reception there’s still time to see this collection. Artwork will be on display and available for purchase, now through May 15, 2016.

More photos from the night :

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SJ Riley a.k.a Sonne Hernandez


Crushed

Crushed

SJ Riley
Oil on Canvas
16" x 20"
$900

Typo II

Typo II

SJ Riley
Oil on Canvas
20" x 24"
$1,800

Fast Car

Fast Car

SJ Riley
Oil on Canvas
18" x 24"
$1,500

Marilyn

Marilyn

SJ Riley
Oil on Canvas
18" x 24"
$1,200

The Queen

The Queen

SJ Riley
Oil on Canvas
18" x 24"
$1,200

Tigger

Tigger

SJ Riley
Oil on Canvas
36" x 40"
$4,500

Glimpse

Glimpse

SJ Riley
Oil on Canvas
5ft x 6ft
$6,500

Army

Army

SJ Riley
Oil on Canvas
24" x 30"
$1,800

Crushed Back

Crushed Back

SJ Riley
Oil on Canvas
16" x 20"
$900

Checks and Balances

Checks and Balances

Sonne Hernandez
Oil on Canvas
4ft x 6ft
$4,500

Flip Side

Flip Side

Sonne Hernandez
Oil on Canvas
36" x 36"
$2,500

System Preferences

System Preferences

Sonne Hernandez
Oil on Canvas
36" x 36"
$2,500


 
Bio PicBrooklyn based artist, S J Riley, focuses in on the details and movement of her subject. Her abstract photo-realism oil paintings evoke the viewer to both come closer and stand back to visually process her paintings. The subject matter is blown up or in movement to the point where the contents become hidden. The absence of hard lines and instead soft layered brushstrokes’ that bleed into one another give the surface a very abstract feel. Until the subject reveals itself and suddenly it’s realism.  

Riley approaches her composition with her deteriorating eyes, being severely near-sighted she mimics how she sees her world around her. Having to come very close to recognize the object while everything around it disappears and from a distance how objects just bleed into one another or produce movement. The final outcome is a feeling of larger than life.

Q&A With DiMauro Dance


Earlier this week, we got the chance to speak with Jessica DiMauro -Artistic Director/Choreographer of DiMauro Dance. Through a quick Q&A, Jessica gave us some insight on the history and inspiration behind DiMauro Dance.

We’re so excited to welcome the team to our Manhattan showroom on February 4th from 5-8pm at 200 LEX. 

They will be preforming a modern dance routine at the Opening Reception of ‘the Fanciful World’. This event will coincide with transFORM’s Second Annual 7th Heaven Design Party, sponsored by the Interior Design Society, New York Chapter. All of the showrooms on the Seventh Floor of the New York Design Center will be open and full of surprises to make your evening magical. Each showroom will be presenting their own innovative designs, unique displays, crafted cocktails and heavenly culinary indulgences.

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(Photography by Yi-Chun Wu)

DiMauro Dance is a five-member company characterized by the use of emotional intent, athleticism, grounded physicality and urban influenced movement. The company is based in Manhattan, with roots in Westchester County. Jessica’s choreography has been seen at venues throughout the Tri-state area.

Q: What is your main inspiration for dance?

A: As a choreographer deeply invested in the artistic exploration of the human experience, I am intrigued by the challenge of developing literal gesture into abstract movement while keeping the emotional integrity. In my work, the body is used as a vessel to express the rich layers of human emotion. I am constantly fascinated by the body’s ability to express subtlety and grace, and conversely show aggression and struggle. My choreography tells a story or sheds light on a particular subject, while giving the performer the opportunity to viscerally experience the emotional intention through movement. I compose movement that is structurally athletic and emotionally driven by raw human emotion. Through performances that utilize community participation as a foundation, I have made it a goal to bring the public into the world of concert dance; specifically the infrequent dance spectator who is intimidated, frustrated or confused by the opacity of modern dance. As an artist, I want to create work that entertains with depth. Personal stories and emotional journeys are revealed through movement that is accessible and experienced by the people who watch it.

Q: What made you want to create your own dance company?

A: In 2006, I created DiMauro Dance in response to the lack of opportunity for modern dancers. My peers and I were craving performance experience and I became proactive in searching out opportunity for us as a group. Since then, many of my dancers have changed, but the goal remains the same; creating a place for us and our art to be seen and experienced.

Q: Where are the different venues that you have performed at?

A: We have performed our work at traditional venues, including Manhattan Movement & Arts Center, The Flea Theater, Purchase College, and The Crystal Theater. We have also engaged in cite-specific work at non-traditional venues such as a community garden in Manhattan and a floating barge on the Hudson River.

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(The Annual Benefit for the Steffi Nossen School of Dance and The Dance in Education Fund, Purchase College – Photography by Bill Bramswig)

Q: Can you clarify your connection with the Steffi Nossen School of Dance in White Plains?

A: We do not operate as a school, but rather a fiscally sponsored dance company made up of freelance artists. However, we are very much connected to Steffi Nossen School of Dance in White Plains, NY. Aside from being Artistic Director of DiMauro Dance, I am also Artistic Director of Steffi Nossen and many of my dancers have taught there. We have done company residencies and many performances through the dance school, as well as have an ongoing Space Grant from their dance foundation.

Q: What style of dance do you prefer?

A: We work primarily in modern dance but continue to be inspired by a number of dance genres.

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(Photography by Yi-Chun Wu)

Q: What challenges do you think you’ll encounter when preforming at our space?

A: We rarely have so much space to move in! The challenge will be utilizing the space in the hallway portion of our performance, and then majorly downsizing when performing in the gallery.

Q: What are you most excited about when performing at our space?

A: We love bringing modern dance into non-traditional settings! I am also thrilled that we will be including live music in this performance!

For more information about this event please visit here. 

Jessica DiMauro Short Reel 2014 from Jessica DiMauro on Vimeo.

 

Irina Gorbman


I See Well

I See Well

Giclee Print
20” x 20”

Water

Water

Giclee Print
20” x 20”

Night at Bahamas

Night at Bahamas

Giclee Print
20” x 20”

Live Green

Live Green

Giclee Print
20” x 20”

Unknown Origin

Unknown Origin

Giclee Print
20” x 20”

Colored Ice

Colored Ice

Giclee Print
20” x 20”

Behind The Curtain

Behind The Curtain

Giclee Print
20” x 20”

Move On Regardless

Move On Regardless

Giclee Print
20” x 20”

Stillness 2

Stillness 2

Giclee Print
20” x 20”

 

IrinaGorbman-headshot-crop

 

After moving from Russia to America, Irina started an art dealer business focused on high-ranking Russian artists, and started to discover her own passion and talent in art.

Through her own painting experience, Irina discovered the healing power of abstract art and its derivatives. Her abstract works are distilled from the soul of nature, infused with a meditative and deeply healing sensation.

“The idea behind my works is to project the positive energy of bright, dynamic colors and make interiors shine.  Create Zen feeling to make people feel happy.

My slogan is, to quote Kandinsky, “To bring the whole into harmony on the canvas is what leads to a work of art.” I like art images look simple, beautiful and exquisite.  Based on original oils, derivative patterns have been designed for giclees, wallpaper and textile applications.  Collection of patterns and hues offers mix and match combination of original paintings, giclees, upholstery, curtains and hand-made rugs – all in one package.”

 

Charlotta Janssen


Agricultural Abundance, Do Not Spindle: Cow

Agricultural Abundance, Do Not Spindle: Cow

Oil, Acrylic, Iron Oxide & Collage Onto Canvas
52" x 72"

Two Boxers

Two Boxers

Acrylic & Iron Oxide Onto Paper
20" x 30"

The Fabric of Lincoln

The Fabric of Lincoln

Oil, Acrylic, Iron Oxide & Collage Onto Canvas
24" x 36"

Buffalo Soldier

Buffalo Soldier

Oil, Acrylic, Iron Oxide & Collage Onto Canvas
24" x 72"

Man and Machine: Flight (Clifford Harmon before the Crash)

Man and Machine: Flight (Clifford Harmon before the Crash)

Oil, Acrylic, Iron Oxide & Collage Onto Canvas
48" x 48"

Man and Invention: Coxey’s Lifesavers & Water Wings

Man and Invention: Coxey’s Lifesavers & Water Wings

Oil, Acrylic, Iron Oxide & Collage Onto Canvas
48" x 72"

I Want To Thank Bank of America For My Adjustable Rate Mortgage

I Want To Thank Bank of America For My Adjustable Rate Mortgage

Oil, Acrylic, Iron Oxide & Collage Onto Canvas
48" x 72"

 

Charlotta-headshot

“I work in a subject matter of portraiture, politics, and banality. I’m a figurative painter, though to me it’s so abstract, that it’s concrete: I just like having a figurative excuse to distribute paint unevenly onto a canvas. My medium is acrylic, oil, iron oxide (rust) and collage. The color spectrum is narrow on the cusp of black and white and color: core tones are black, white, teal and rust.

I am strongly influenced by the great void of Americana, classic portraiture, my German roots and my life in Brooklyn which to me is the tactility of the now: t a lot of urban decay which I often express in collage onto the painted work. I’m awestruck by Romare Bearden for his great use of collage and composition, Jacob Lawrence for his use of simple materials (cheap paints and lined pages) to make great work, Francis Bacon for his fearless exposure of the un-pretty human shape as well as Lucian Freud, Edward Hopper for his almost effortless depiction of the void and Norman Rockwell for his courageous depiction of kitsch. Photographers such as Ingrid Maier, Walker Evans and Dorothea Lange inspire me for their stark light and strong composition of people in every day settings as well as Disfarmer for his awkward portraiture.

I love the human stench with all its faults and beauty. I love painting it into what I call augmented portraiture: a portrait /painting with collage and retro-collage, giving you the tactility and possibly of glance at the person’s or persons’ “now” and “story”. It’s a way of bringing in sound bites, textures, abstract shapes and color into the composition.”

Jeff Schneider


Red Target

Red Target

Oil & Acrylic on Linen
48” x 36”

Hit or Miss

Hit or Miss

Oil & Acrylic on Linen
46” x 34”

Exercise One

Exercise One

Oil & Acrylic on Linen
46” x 34”

Three Riders

Three Riders

Oil & Acrylic on Linen
40” x 34”

Sundown

Sundown

Oil & Acrylic on Linen
48” x 36”

Four Lemons

Four Lemons

Oil & Acrylic on Linen
42” x 72”

Duel in the Sun

Duel in the Sun

Oil & Acrylic on Linen
46” x 72”

 

JeffSchneider-Headshot

Artist Jeff Schneider’s take on the West brings in overlapping themes of nature and persona that question both the nature and possibility of unity.

“I consider these paintings randomly narrative. They work by association, making unlikely connections between different types of images, languages and signs. It is my intention to leave the viewer puzzled as to where and how meaning lies between relationships. To question the nature and possibility of unity through representational and abstract concepts.”

Irish Times Art Critic, Aidan Dunne, commented, “Cowboys in saddles, smoking models, posed fruit and drapery are given room and strength to claim their own identity within a single canvas.  In Schneider’s paintings, independent fields of unlikely imagery pulsate.  Foreground and background vibrate off each other, switching roles.  Sophisticatedly staged, the artist utilizes color to create frictional, fictional, interchangeable relationships among the paintings components.  Schneider’s colors separate and engage elements of his paintings in active play for presence, dominance and the favor of the crowd’s eye”.