Tag: design center


Soviet Posters


 

Humpbacked Horse

Humpbacked Horse

Original Poster

Red Army

Red Army

Original Poster

Mikhail Botvinnik

Mikhail Botvinnik

Original Poster

Berlin Wall

Berlin Wall

Original Poster

Beat the Enemy

Beat the Enemy

Giclee Print

 

 

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Ralph Gabriner


Bronx Rock Crusher

Bronx Rock Crusher

Pigment Inkjet Print
12” x 18”
--------
13” x 20”

Bronx Tire Shop

Bronx Tire Shop

Pigment Inkjet Print
12” x 18”
--------
13” x 20”

Broadway and 238th St.

Broadway and 238th St.

Pigment Inkjet Print
18” x 12”
--------
20” x 13”

Coney Island

Coney Island

Pigment Inkjet Print
12” x 18”
--------
13” x 20”

Van Cortlandt Park

Van Cortlandt Park

Pigment Inkjet Print
12” x 18”
--------
13” x 20”

Metro North Bronx NY

Metro North Bronx NY

Pigment Inkjet Print
18” x 12”
--------
20” x 13”

 

Ralph Gabriner-headshot“These photographs are no act of imagination. They exist only as the accidental result of shoe leather meeting subject matter. This is my way of saying at the outset that I approach without preconception.  Anyway, life is much stranger than I could ever imagine.  It is an odd fact, but for me the act of stumbling around is more effective as a method for taking pictures (even though it’s a tiresome process) than it would be to hire some actors and stage a play for the camera.

For example, I would never have the imagination to blow life into a line of laundry as it was drying on a windy day.  And, it would never occur to me to devise a giant machine that crushes rock and then place a man on top of this machine wearing a bandana while the mirage of a new car floats in the sky behind him.  Only the greatest theatrical talent could imagine such a thing, and then to stage it, why it would cost a fortune!  It’s better to stroll around the Bronx where such things are known to take place, free of charge.  And, even if you had the money to squander on such a project how would you ever train birds to fly in formation beneath an overhead pipeline?

No, I’ve thought about this awhile now, and I’ve come to this conclusion:  There is no concept born in my brain that could ever be as vital as the interweaving of elements that occurs every day without my even saying a word or issuing a command.  One just has to get out and “be there.”  In case you don’t have the time for that, I’ve done it for you.”

Tracy Helgeson


Bound By Shadows

Bound By Shadows

Oil on Wood Panel
24” x 30” x 2”

Divided

Divided

Oil on Wood Panel
9” x 18” x 1”

Surrounding Hills

Surrounding Hills

Oil on Wood Panel
18” x 18” x 1”
SOLD

Sweet Corn at Sundown

Sweet Corn at Sundown

Oil on Wood Panel
16” x 18” x 1”

The Big Pink (Barn)

The Big Pink (Barn)

Oil on Wood Panel
30” x 40” x 2”

Dark Barn with Sheep

Dark Barn with Sheep

Oil on Wood Panel
18” x 14” x 1”
$1,200

Sheep Study #838

Sheep Study #838

Oil on Wood Panel
5” x 7” x 1”
SOLD

Sheep Study #839

Sheep Study #839

Oil on Wood Panel
6” x 6” x 1”

Sheep Study #840

Sheep Study #840

Oil on Wood Panel
6” x 6” x 1”
SOLD

Barn Study #827

Barn Study #827

Oil on Wood Panel
6” x 6” x 1”

Red Dress

Red Dress

Oil on Wood Panel
48" x 36" x 2"

 

Tracy-headshot

Artist Tracy Helgeson paints the classic subject of America’s rural culture and agricultural community, capturing an era once forgotten, yet preserved at the same time. There is a modern, otherworldly take on her subjects and locations.

Tracy explains it best, “In creating a painting, my intent is to capture an evocative feeling and an essence of a landscape, structure or person that I feel a connection to. The images that I choose usually have a basis in reality, but I often alter composition, color and light to more accurately express my feelings about how and what I see.

I truly appreciate the process of painting; the texture of the surfaces that I prepare, the richness of the colors and glazes that I choose, the softness of a brush, the smell of the paint, medium and solvent and the excitement of creating an image.”

Charlotta Janssen


Agricultural Abundance, Do Not Spindle: Cow

Agricultural Abundance, Do Not Spindle: Cow

Oil, Acrylic, Iron Oxide & Collage Onto Canvas
52" x 72"

Two Boxers

Two Boxers

Acrylic & Iron Oxide Onto Paper
20" x 30"

The Fabric of Lincoln

The Fabric of Lincoln

Oil, Acrylic, Iron Oxide & Collage Onto Canvas
24" x 36"

Buffalo Soldier

Buffalo Soldier

Oil, Acrylic, Iron Oxide & Collage Onto Canvas
24" x 72"

Man and Machine: Flight (Clifford Harmon before the Crash)

Man and Machine: Flight (Clifford Harmon before the Crash)

Oil, Acrylic, Iron Oxide & Collage Onto Canvas
48" x 48"

Man and Invention: Coxey’s Lifesavers & Water Wings

Man and Invention: Coxey’s Lifesavers & Water Wings

Oil, Acrylic, Iron Oxide & Collage Onto Canvas
48" x 72"

I Want To Thank Bank of America For My Adjustable Rate Mortgage

I Want To Thank Bank of America For My Adjustable Rate Mortgage

Oil, Acrylic, Iron Oxide & Collage Onto Canvas
48" x 72"

 

Charlotta-headshot

“I work in a subject matter of portraiture, politics, and banality. I’m a figurative painter, though to me it’s so abstract, that it’s concrete: I just like having a figurative excuse to distribute paint unevenly onto a canvas. My medium is acrylic, oil, iron oxide (rust) and collage. The color spectrum is narrow on the cusp of black and white and color: core tones are black, white, teal and rust.

I am strongly influenced by the great void of Americana, classic portraiture, my German roots and my life in Brooklyn which to me is the tactility of the now: t a lot of urban decay which I often express in collage onto the painted work. I’m awestruck by Romare Bearden for his great use of collage and composition, Jacob Lawrence for his use of simple materials (cheap paints and lined pages) to make great work, Francis Bacon for his fearless exposure of the un-pretty human shape as well as Lucian Freud, Edward Hopper for his almost effortless depiction of the void and Norman Rockwell for his courageous depiction of kitsch. Photographers such as Ingrid Maier, Walker Evans and Dorothea Lange inspire me for their stark light and strong composition of people in every day settings as well as Disfarmer for his awkward portraiture.

I love the human stench with all its faults and beauty. I love painting it into what I call augmented portraiture: a portrait /painting with collage and retro-collage, giving you the tactility and possibly of glance at the person’s or persons’ “now” and “story”. It’s a way of bringing in sound bites, textures, abstract shapes and color into the composition.”

Jeff Schneider


Red Target

Red Target

Oil & Acrylic on Linen
48” x 36”

Hit or Miss

Hit or Miss

Oil & Acrylic on Linen
46” x 34”

Exercise One

Exercise One

Oil & Acrylic on Linen
46” x 34”

Three Riders

Three Riders

Oil & Acrylic on Linen
40” x 34”

Sundown

Sundown

Oil & Acrylic on Linen
48” x 36”

Four Lemons

Four Lemons

Oil & Acrylic on Linen
42” x 72”

Duel in the Sun

Duel in the Sun

Oil & Acrylic on Linen
46” x 72”

 

JeffSchneider-Headshot

Artist Jeff Schneider’s take on the West brings in overlapping themes of nature and persona that question both the nature and possibility of unity.

“I consider these paintings randomly narrative. They work by association, making unlikely connections between different types of images, languages and signs. It is my intention to leave the viewer puzzled as to where and how meaning lies between relationships. To question the nature and possibility of unity through representational and abstract concepts.”

Irish Times Art Critic, Aidan Dunne, commented, “Cowboys in saddles, smoking models, posed fruit and drapery are given room and strength to claim their own identity within a single canvas.  In Schneider’s paintings, independent fields of unlikely imagery pulsate.  Foreground and background vibrate off each other, switching roles.  Sophisticatedly staged, the artist utilizes color to create frictional, fictional, interchangeable relationships among the paintings components.  Schneider’s colors separate and engage elements of his paintings in active play for presence, dominance and the favor of the crowd’s eye”.

Presenting: AMERICANA at 200 LEX


transform gallery-art opening-exhibit-NYC-Manhattan-200 lex-americana-painting-photography-nydc-party-reception-design center-new york-art-artists-new york city

Opening Reception at the 7th Heaven Design Party  
Sponsored by LUXE Magazine and ASID
Join us at the Opening Reception for AMERICANA on February 5th, from 5 to 9 pm, at the 7th HEAVEN DESIGN PARTY sponsored by LUXE Magazine and the ASID in conjunction with 200 LEX ‘s 7th Floor Showrooms. Take the opportunity to view American life through the works of artists Jeff Schneider, Charlotta Janssen, Tracy Helgeson, and Ralph Gabriner. This collection of artists interprets, reacts and portrays our diverse American iconography from the different viewpoints of history, culture and geography.
About Artist Jeff Schneider

AMERICANA_BLOG_Jeff

Artist Jeff Schneider’s take on the West brings in overlapping themes of nature and persona that question both the nature and possibility of unity, by making unlikely connections between different types of images, signs and visual languages. Irish Times Art Critic, Aidan Dunne, commented, “Cowboys in saddles, smoking models, posed fruit and drapery are given room and strength to claim their own identity within a single canvas.  In Schneider’s paintings, independent fields of unlikely imagery pulsate.  Foreground and background vibrate off each other, switching roles.  Sophisticatedly staged, the artist utilizes color to create frictional, fictional, interchangeable relationships among the paintings components.  Schneider’s colors separate and engage elements of his paintings in active play for presence, dominance and the favor of the crowd’s eye”.

About Artist Charlotta Janssen
transform gallery-art opening-exhibit-NYC-Manhattan-200 lex-americana-painting-photography-nydc-party-reception-design center-new york-art-artists-new york city

Artist Charlotta Janssen’s work comments on the societal issues of race, the culture of the era which her subjects are depicted and the American lifestyle in general. This can be seen with paintings of the recent housing and loan scandal, (starting in 2008), to the civil rights movement of the 1960’s, to a man at a lunch counter. Whether painting a marching band group portrait or solitary cow in a field, the viewer feels they are taken on a “slightly altered reality tour” with the use or her color palette and her technique, while all the while letting the honesty of her subjects shine through. As Charlotta states: “I rummage through flea markets and photo archives or I hit up friends for old family pics. I make large scale paintings of them in a color palette limited to black, white, aqua and iron oxide, which I rust after I finish the piece. I love the time before people were aware of their photo persona: from the teens through the forties. In 2009 I reintroduced collage and this element created a real conversation that keeps evolving. This is my ‘thang’ for a while now.”

About Artist Tracy Helgeson 

transform gallery-art opening-exhibit-NYC-Manhattan-200 lex-americana-painting-photography-nydc-party-reception-design center-new york-art-artists-new york city

Artist Tracy Helegson paints the classic subject of America’s rural culture and agricultural community,capturing a era once forgotten, yet preserved at the same time.  There is a modern, other-worldly take on her subjects and locations.  Tracy explains it best, “In creating a painting, my intent is to capture an evocative feeling and an essence of a landscape, structure or person that I feel a connection to. The images that I choose usually have a basis in reality, but I often alter composition, color and light to more accurately express my feelings about how and what I see. I truly appreciate the process of painting; the texture of the surfaces that I prepare, the richness of the colors and glazes that I choose, the softness of a brush, the smell of the paint, medium and solvent and the excitement of creating an image”.

About Artist Ralph Gabriner 

transform gallery-art opening-exhibit-NYC-Manhattan-200 lex-americana-painting-photography-nydc-party-reception-design center-new york-art-artists-new york city

Photographer Ralph Gabriner captures his iconic images by chance and does not set out with the purpose to make a statement on society.  His interest lies in light sources and with people in motion. He reacts to what he see and documents it.  When I asked him why he photographed his topics of, for instance, the series, “Night Scenes” which depicts night time in the Bronx, his answer was, “Just because”.  If something or someone grabs his eye, he shoots it.  Ralph feels that photographers have lost or are losing their connection to their impulses and set out to photograph with an agenda. Ralph lets others find the meanings in his photos. In Ralph’s words, “These photographs are no act of imagination. They exist only as the accidental result of shoe leather meeting subject matter. This is my way of saying at the outset that I approach without preconception. Anyway, life is much stranger than I could ever imagine. It is an odd fact, but for me the act of stumbling around is more effective as a method for taking pictures (even though it’s a tiresome process) than it would be to hire some actors and stage a play for the camera.”

About the 7th Heaven Design Party

transform gallery-art opening-exhibit-NYC-Manhattan-200 lex-americana-painting-photography-nydc-party-reception-design center-new york-art-artists-new york city

We cordially invite you to experience 7th Heaven. Join us on February 5th, from 5pm – 9pm to explore and celebrate the spirit of great design on the 7th floor at 200 LEX. All of the showrooms on the Seventh Floor of the New York Design Center will be open and full of surprises to make your evening magical.  Each showroom will be presenting their own innovative designs, unique displays, crafted cocktails and heavenly culinary indulgences.  Don’t miss this opportunity to see some of New York’s finest furnishings and catch a warming drink with wonderful company on a cold winter’s night.

Please RSVP to rsvp@transformgallery.com
transformgallery.com | 212.584.9580 | 200 Lex Ave. Suite 708, NYC, 10016