Tag: water


Michael Thornton-Smith


 

Blue Dandelion (2015)

Blue Dandelion (2015)

Acrylic on Canvas
36" x 36"
$3,200

Dandelion - Towards the Celestial (2016)

Dandelion - Towards the Celestial (2016)

Acrylic on Canvas
36" x 36"
$3,200

Dandelion - Small Orbit (2015)

Dandelion - Small Orbit (2015)

Acrylic on Canvas
24" x 24"
$2,200

Dandelion - Orbit (2015)

Dandelion - Orbit (2015)

Acrylic on Graphite on Canvas
50" x 50"
$7,200

Dandelion VI (2015)

Dandelion VI (2015)

Acrylic on Graphite on Paper
26" x 26"
$1,800

White Orchid (2015)

White Orchid (2015)

Acrylic on Graphite on Paper
26" x 26"
$2,600
Framed

Purple Orchid (2015)

Purple Orchid (2015)

Acrylic on Graphite on Paper
26" x 26"
$2,600
Framed

Orchid III (2015)

Orchid III (2015)

Acrylic on Graphite on Paper
26" x 26"
$1,800

Orchid IV (2015)

Orchid IV (2015)

Acrylic on Graphite on Paper
26" x 26"
$1,800

Dahlia I (2015)

Dahlia I (2015)

Acrylic on Graphite on Paper
26" x 26"
$1,800

Globe Thistle I (2015)

Globe Thistle I (2015)

Acrylic on Graphite on Paper
26" x 26"
$1,800

Globe Thistle III (2015)

Globe Thistle III (2015)

Acrylic on Graphite on Paper
26" x 26"
$1,800

Peony I (2015)

Peony I (2015)

Acrylic on Graphite on Paper
26" x 26"
$1,800

Peony II (2015)

Peony II (2015)

Acrylic on Graphite on Paper
26" x 26"
$1,800

Lobelia II (2015)

Lobelia II (2015)

Acrylic on Graphite on Paper
26" x 26"
$1,800

Lobelia IV (2015)

Lobelia IV (2015)

Acrylic on Graphite on Paper
26" x 26"
$1,800

MTS-Headshot“I was raised in Cornwall, and grew up in the English countryside. My earliest sketches were studies of his surroundings, locations that I felt moved to record. I have been influenced by the tradition of British landscape painting, particularly in my early works.”

Michael Thornton-Smith, began with an exploration into the dynamic forms and saturated colors of selected flowers. “As I became more comfortable working with a subject matter I had shied away from previously; I began to play with enormity, scale and abstraction of the subject attempting to achieve a luminosity inherent in particular varieties of flowers. The dandelion flower gone to seed became a jumping off point to create cosmic mandalas of light. At first they were monochromatic paintings concentrating on the essence of form but eventually led to working with ethereal and tertiary colors. This is an ongoing project.

My paintings express a response to my perception of nature, to the transient acts of weather and the tenuous beauty of spontaneous cloud formations, captured in a fleeting moment. Traveling has been a source of inspiration for my work, taking me throughout the British Isles and Europe, and later through North Africa and East Africa. There is a body of my work that celebrates these experiences.

Sometimes I work from numerous studies, not always from the same location, but all with a view to a larger work. I love the skies, the source of light and the constantly changing barometric configurations. The expansive, magical thunderstorms over the savannah, the atmospheric conditions and their effect on the terrain; and more recently, the alluvial landscapes of the Hudson River Valley and the Long Island Sound.”

 

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Vaho Muskheli


Study of Horse #1

Study of Horse #1

Charcoal on Paper
30” x 22”

Study of Horse #2

Study of Horse #2

Charcoal on Paper
22” x 30”

Study of Horse #3

Study of Horse #3

Charcoal on Paper
30” x 22”

Study of Man #1

Study of Man #1

Charcoal on Paper
30” x 22”

Study of Man #2

Study of Man #2

Charcoal on Paper
30” x 22”

Vaho Muskheli-headshot

“As a young artist I remember struggling to find my own vision, to develop my own signature in art.  It was not quick and easy.  I copied the old masters every night until three o’clock in the morning.  It was an incredible relationship – as if they lived with me in spirit and we were working together.  I was changing my style frequently, looking for my own vision to emerge, and eventually I found myself in figurative art where I could express my personality most fully.”

Vaho Muskheli combines classical styles in unexpected ways, resulting in a simultaneous sense of recognition and surprise.  Muskheli was trained in the tradition of socialist realism, and studied old masters in order to develop his own vision and style. The emotional intensity and mastery of the Muskheli’s works are comparable to ones by Michelangelo, Bosch, Bruegel and the great surrealists.

Vaho Muskheli acknowledges: “Michelangelo taught me how to draw, Rembrandt showed me color, and Bruegel taught me how to think.   And I found myself in the imaginary realism that fuses the expressiveness of figurative art and a sense of Georgia, her mountains, her waters and her history—all fantastically transformed”.